Available Search Filters

Fi360 provides investment data on Open-ended Mutual Funds, Collective Investment Trusts, Exchange Traded Funds, Separate Accounts, Variable Annuities and Group Annuity vehicles. Unconstrained, that is over 230,000 investment vehicles. 


Search Filters allow the for research to be conducted on investment vehicles that meet specific criteria.


Available Search Filters in the Fiduciary Focus Toolkit are below:

 
Basic

Fund Family
A company which offers mutual funds. Generally speaking, the company name is included in the official fund name.

Investment Universe
A grouping of a set of investments that share a common feature such as the same market capitalization, industry or index.

Peer Group (Morningstar Category)
In an effort to distinguish funds by what they own, as well as by their prospectus objectives and styles, Morningstar developed the Morningstar Categories. While the prospectus objective identifies a fund's investment goals based on the wording in the fund prospectus, the Morningstar Category identifies funds based on their actual investment styles as measured by their underlying portfolio holdings (portfolio and other statistics over the past three years). See specific category name for further details (i.e. "Peer Group - Large Value").

Search by name, ticker or cusip
A means of searching for an investment by a unique identifier.

Share Class
A share class is a designation applied to a specified type of security such as common stock or mutual fund units. Companies that have more than one class of common stock usually identify a given class with alphabetic markers, such as "Class A" shares and "Class B" shares.


Expenses

12B-1 Fee
The maximum annual charge deducted from fund assets to pay for distribution and marketing costs. Although usually set on a percentage basis, this amount will occasionally be a flat figure. Only active 12b-1 plans are represented here. This information is taken directly from the fund’s prospectus and represented as a percentage within our feed.

Deferred Load
Also known as a back-end sales charge, this is imposed when investors redeem shares. The percentage charged generally declines the longer shares are held, and it is usually applied to the lower of the beginning price or ending price.

Front Load
The initial, or front-end, sales charge is a one-time deduction from an investment made into the fund. The amount is generally relative to the amount of the investment, so that larger investments incur smaller rates of charge. The sales charge serves as a commission for the broker who sold the fund. A fund's potential fees and sales charges are an important factor to consider before making an investment. The load fee compensates the broker or financial planner for the service of providing professional investment advice.

Prospectus Net Exp. Ratio- % rank
The placement of a particular fund in a ranking, with 1 being the highest percentile and 100 the lowest, of its peers (Morningstar Category) for prospectus net expense ratio. The prospectus net expense ratio is the percentage of fund assets, net of reimbursements, used to pay for operating expenses and management fees, including 12b-1 fees, administrative fees, and all other asset-based costs incurred by the fund, except brokerage costs. Fund expenses are reflected in the fund's NAV. Sales charges are not included in the expense ratio. The expense ratio for fund of funds is the aggregate expense ratio as defined as the sum of the wrap or sponsor fees plus the estimated weighted average of the underlying fund fees. Net reimbursements, the Prospectus Net Expense Ratio is collected annually from a fund's prospectus.

Fi360 Fiduciary Score®
Fi360 Fiduciary Score® The Fi360 Fiduciary Score is a peer percent ranking of an investment against a set of quantitative due diligence criteria selected to reflect prudent fiduciary management. The Fi360 Fiduciary Score is calculated on a monthly basis for investments with at least a three year history. Note: Group Retirement Plan Annuities (GRPAs) are ranked in a peer group that includes GRPAs, Mutual Funds and ETFs. Prior to 9/30/2013 only Mutual Funds and ETFs were used to construct the peer group.

Fi360 Fiduciary Score® Avg. (1 Yr.)
A 1-year rolling average of an investment's Fi360 Fiduciary Score. The Fiduciary Score is calculated on a monthly basis. Since the Average Score is a rolling average of the historical Fi360 Fiduciary Score, an investment needs 12 Fiduciary Score calculations in order to have a 1-year average.

Fi360 Fiduciary Score® Avg. (3 Yr.)
A 3-year rolling average of an investment's Fi360 Fiduciary Score. The Fiduciary Score is calculated on a monthly basis. Since the Average Score is a rolling average of the historical Fi360 Fiduciary Score, an investment needs 36 Fiduciary Score calculations in order to have a 3-year average.

Fi360 Fiduciary Score® Avg. (5 Yr.)
A 5-year rolling average of an investment's Fi360 Fiduciary Score. The Fiduciary Score is calculated on a monthly basis. Since the Average Score is a rolling average of the historical Fi360 Fiduciary Score, an investment needs 60 Fiduciary Score calculations in order to have a 5-year average.

Fi360 Fiduciary Score® Avg. (10 Yr.)
A 10-year rolling average of an investment's Fi360 Fiduciary Score. The Fiduciary Score is calculated on a monthly basis. Since the Average Score is a rolling average of the historical Fi360 Fiduciary Score, an investment needs 120 Fiduciary Score calculations in order to have a 10-year average.


Operations
 

Composition Screen (> 80% threshold)
At least 80% of the investment’s underlying securities should be consistent with the broad asset class. For example, a Large-Cap Growth investment should not hold more than 20% in cash, fixed income, and/or international securities. The broad asset classes used in the composition criterion include: U.S. Stocks, U.S. Bonds, and Non-U.S. Stocks. The Long-Short peer group is evaluated on the U.S. Stock and cash composition.

Fund of Funds
A fund that specializes in buying shares in other mutual funds rather than individual securities. Quite often this type of fund is not discernible from its name alone, but rather through prospectus wording (i.e. the fund's charter).

Index Fund
A fund that tracks a particular index and attempts to match returns. While an index typically has a much larger portfolio than a mutual fund, the fund's management may study the index's movements to develop a representative sampling, and match sectors proportionately.

Intl. Stock %
The percent of portfolio assets in non-US stocks.

Investment Type
Otherwise known as investment strategy. An active management approach for the investment strategy relies on analytic research, judgment and experience for investment decisions. A passive management investment approach seeks to exactly replicate the returns of an index. Target date funds and money market funds are denoted by the peer group they belong to.

Life Cycle Fund
This indicates if the fund is geared toward investors of a certain age or with a specific time horizon for investing. It is used to indicate a 'glidepath' fund where the allocation shifts over time.

Manager Tenure
The number of years that the current manager has been managing the fund.

Minimum Initial Investment
This data point indicates if the fund selectively invests based on certain non-economic principles. Such funds may make investments based on such issues as environmental responsibility, human rights, or religious views. A socially conscious fund may take a pro-active stance by selectively investing in, for example, environmentally-friendly companies, or firms with good employee relations. This group also includes funds that avoid investing in companies involved in promoting alcohol, tobacco, or gambling, or in the defense industry.

Net Assets (in Millions)
The month-end net assets of an investment vehicle, recorded in millions of dollars. Net-asset figures are useful in gauging a fund's size, agility, and popularity. They help determine whether a small company fund, for example, can remain in its investment-objective category if its asset base reaches an ungainly size.The assets are totaled across all share classes of the fund.

Socially Responsible Investment
Any fund that selectively invests based on certain non-economic principles. Such funds may make investments based on such issues as environmental responsibility, human rights, or religious views. A socially conscious fund may take a pro-active stance by selectively investing in, for example, environmentally-friendly companies, or firms with good employee relations. This group also includes funds that avoid investing in companies involved in promoting alcohol, tobacco, or gambling, or in the defense industry.

Style Screen
The investment should be highly correlated to the asset class of the investment option, i.e., the Morningstar Style Box™ for the current period must match the peer group of the investment.

US Bond %
The percent of portfolio assets in domestic bonds. Bonds include everything from U.S. government notes to high-yield U.S. corporate bonds to U.S. municipal bonds.

US Stock %
The percentage of portfolio assets invested in U.S. common stocks.

Years since inception
The number of years since the date on which the fund began its operations. Funds with long track records offer more history by which investors can assess overall fund performance. However, another important factor to consider is the fund manager and his or her tenure with the fund. Often times a change in fund performance can indicate a change in management.


Performance

Return % Rank (YTD, 1,3-Month)
The placement of a particular fund in a ranking, with 1 being the highest percentile and 100 the lowest, of its peers (Morningstar Category) for returns for periods shorter than one year. Expressed in percentage terms, Morningstar's calculation of total return is determined each month by taking the change in monthly net asset value, reinvesting all income and capital-gains distributions during that month, and dividing by the starting NAV. Reinvestments are made using the actual reinvestment NAV, and daily payoffs are reinvested monthly. Unless otherwise noted, Morningstar does not adjust total returns for sales charges (such as front-end loads, deferred loads and redemption fees), preferring to give a clearer picture of a fund's performance. The total returns do account for management, administrative, 12b-1 fees and other costs taken out of fund assets. Total returns for periods longer than one year are expressed in terms of compounded average annual returns (also known as geometric total returns), affording a more meaningful picture of fund performance than non-annualized figures. Returns for periods longer than one year are expressed as annualized returns.

Annualized Return % Rank (1,3,5,10-Year)
The placement of a particular fund in a ranking, with 1 being the highest percentile and 100 the lowest, of its peers (Morningstar Category) for total annualized return. Expressed in percentage terms, Morningstar's calculation of total return is determined each month by taking the change in monthly net asset value, reinvesting all income and capital-gains distributions during that month, and dividing by the starting NAV. Reinvestments are made using the actual reinvestment NAV, and daily payoffs are reinvested monthly. Unless otherwise noted, Morningstar does not adjust total returns for sales charges (such as front-end loads, deferred loads and redemption fees), preferring to give a clearer picture of a fund's performance. The total returns do account for management, administrative, 12b-1 fees and other costs taken out of fund assets. Total returns for periods longer than one year are expressed in terms of compounded average annual returns (also known as geometric total returns), affording a more meaningful picture of fund performance than non-annualized figures. Returns for periods longer than one year are expressed as annualized returns.

Batting Average (1-Yr.)
Batting Average is a measure of a manager's ability to consistently beat the market. It is calculated by dividing the number of months in which the manager beat or matched an index by 12 months, representing the past 12-month period. For example, a manager who meets or outperforms the market every month in a given period would have a batting average of 100. A manager who beats the market half of the time would have a batting average of 50.

Calendar Year Return (5 Previous Years) % Rank
The placement of a particular fund in a ranking, with 1 being the highest percentile and 100 the lowest, of its peers (Morningstar Category) for calendar year returns. Expressed in percentage terms, Morningstar's calculation of total return is determined each month by taking the change in monthly net asset value, reinvesting all income and capital-gains distributions during that month, and dividing by the starting NAV. Reinvestments are made using the actual reinvestment NAV, and daily payoffs are reinvested monthly. Unless otherwise noted, Morningstar does not adjust total returns for sales charges (such as front-end loads, deferred loads and redemption fees), preferring to give a clearer picture of a fund's performance. The total returns do account for management, administrative, 12b-1 fees and other costs taken out of fund assets. Total returns for periods longer than one year are expressed in terms of compounded average annual returns (also known as geometric total returns), affording a more meaningful picture of fund performance than non-annualized figures. Returns for periods longer than one year are expressed as annualized returns.

Down Capture (1,3,5,10-Yr.)
Downside Capture Ratio measures manager's performance in down markets. A down-market is defined as those periods (months or quarters) in which market return is less than 0. In essence, it tells one what percentage of the down-market was captured by the manager. It is calculated by taking the security’s downside capture return for the past 12-month period and dividing it by the benchmark’s downside capture return for the past 12-month period.

Up Capture (1,3,5,10-Yr.)
Upside Capture Ratio measures a manager's performance in up markets relative to the market (benchmark) itself. It is calculated by taking the security’s upside capture return for the past 12-month period and dividing it by the benchmark’s upside capture return for the past 12-month period.

Up/Down Capture Ratio (1,3,5,10-Yr.)
Upside/downside capture ratio show you whether a given fund has outperformed--gained more or lost less than--a broad market benchmark during periods of market strength and weakness, and if so, by how much.

Yield (1 Year Trailing) % rank
A calculation based on a 30-day period ending on the last of the previous month. It is computed by dividing the net investment income per share earned during the period by the maximum offering price per share on the last day of the period. The figure is taken from fund company surveys and could be provided on a lag by the fund company. When a dash appears, the yield available is more than 90 days old or not provided.

Yield (30 day SEC) % rank
Also known as a distribution yield, Morningstar computes this figure by summing all income distributions paid over the past 12 months and dividing the total by the most recent month-end NAV plus any capital gains distributed over the same period. Income refers only to interest payments from fixed-income securities and dividend payoffs from common stocks.


Risk

Alpha (1,3,5,10-Yr.) % rank
The placement of a particular fund in a ranking, with 1 being the highest percentile and 100 the lowest, of its peers (Morningstar Category) for Alpha. Alpha is a measure of the difference between a portfolio’s actual returns and its expected performance, given its level of risk as measured by beta. A positive Alpha figure indicates the portfolio has performed better than its beta would predict. In contrast, a negative Alpha indicates the portfolio has under-performed, given the expectations established by beta. Calculated against the Morningstar primary index.

Beta (1,3,5,10-Yr.)
Beta is a measure of a portfolio's sensitivity to market movements. The beta of the market is 1.00 by definition. Morningstar calculates beta by comparing a portfolio's excess return over T-bills to the benchmark's excess return over T-bills, so a beta of 1.10 shows that the portfolio has performed 10% better than its benchmark in up markets and 10% worse in down markets, assuming all other factors remain constant. Conversely, a beta of 0.85 indicates that the portfolio's excess return is expected to perform 15% worse than the benchmark’s excess return during up markets and 15% better during down markets.

Information Ratio (1,3,5,10-Yr.)
Information ratio is a risk-adjusted performance measure. The information ratio is a special version of the Sharpe Ratio in that the benchmark doesn't have to be the risk-free rate.

Information Ratio (1,3,5,10-Yr.) % rank
The placement of a particular fund in a ranking, with 1 being the highest percentile and 100 the lowest, of its peers (Morningstar Category) for R Squared.Information ratio is a risk-adjusted performance measure. The information ratio is a special version of the Sharpe Ratio in that the benchmark doesn't have to be the risk-free rate.


R Squared (1,3,5,10-Yr.)
Reflects the percentage of a portfolio's movement that can be explained by the movement of its primary (Morningstar) benchmark over the past year. An R-squared of 100 indicates that all movement of a fund can be explained by the movement of the index.

R Squared (1,3,5,10-Yr.) % rank
The placement of a particular fund in a ranking, with 1 being the highest percentile and 100 the lowest, of its peers (Morningstar Category) for R Squared. Reflects the percentage of a portfolio's movement that can be explained by the movement of its primary (Morningstar) benchmark over the past year. An R-squared of 100 indicates that all movement of a fund can be explained by the movement of the index.

Sharpe Ratio (1,3,5,10-Yr.) % rank
"The placement of a particular fund in a ranking, with 1 being the highest percentile and 100 the lowest, of its peers (Morningstar Category) for Sharpe Ratio. Sharpe Ratio is a risk-adjusted measure developed by Nobel Laureate William Sharpe. It is calculated by using standard deviation and excess return to determine reward per unit of risk. The higher the Sharpe Ratio, the better the fund's historical risk-adjusted performance. The Sharpe ratio is calculated by dividing a fund's annualized excess returns by the standard deviation of a fund's annualized excess returns. Since this ratio uses standard deviation as its risk measure, it is most appropriately applied when analyzing a fund that is an investor's sole holding. The Sharpe Ratio can be used to compare two funds directly on how much risk a fund had to bear to earn excess return over the risk-free rate. This calculation references the Risk Free Index of the Fund's assigned Morningstar Category."

Sortino Ratio (1,3,5,10-Yr.) % rank
"The placement of a particular fund in a ranking, with 1 being the highest percentile and 100 the lowest, of its peers (Morningstar Category) for Sortino Ratio. The Sortino Ratio is similar to Sharpe Ratio except it uses downside risk (Downside Deviation) in the denominator. It was developed in early 1980's by Frank Sortino. Since upside variability is not necessary a bad thing, Sortino ratio is sometimes more preferable than Sharpe ratio.

This calculation references the Risk Free Index of the Fund's assigned Morningstar Category."


Tracking Error (1,3,5,10-Yr.)
Tracking error is a measure of the volatility of excess returns relative to a benchmark. Excess returns are the investment's return in excess of its primary benchmark, which is based on broad asset class.

Turnover (1 Yr.) % rank
The placement of a particular fund in a ranking, with 1 being the highest percentile and 100 the lowest, of its peers (Morningstar Category) for turnover. Turnover is a measure of the portfolio manager’s trading activity which is computed by taking the lesser of purchases or sales (excluding all securities with maturities of less than one year) and dividing by average monthly net assets. A turnover ratio of 100% or more does not necessarily suggest that all securities in the portfolio have been traded. In practical terms, the resulting percentage loosely represents the percentage of the portfolio’s holdings that have changed over the past year. Morningstar sources the audited portfolio turnover ratio from a fund's Annual Report.

 

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